February 7, 2019

Dutch company boasts world’s first transparent wood

Filed under: Dutch first by Orangemaster @ 2:21 pm

According to Dutch company Holland Composites in Lelystad, their transparent composite wood panels are the first ever made in the world.

Mark Hoff explains that the company has developed a panel that looks like wood, but when held up to the light, it’s transparent. The panels can be used indoors as partition walls as well as outside as façade panelling. They feature a very thin layer of wood integrated into layers of composites, making them strong, low-maintenance and with a natural look.

The panels are mainly used by project developers and architects, and cannot be found at DIY stores. Watch a short video in Dutch here.

(Link and screenshot of video omroepflevoland.nl)

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November 22, 2015

Studio RAP uses robot to build large organic wooden ceiling

Filed under: Architecture,Design by Branko Collin @ 3:20 pm

skilledin-office-studio-rap

Earlier this year Rotterdam-based ‘architectural design and fabrication studio’ RAP built an indoor office at the InnovationDock in Rotterdam using software to calculate how a single central column could help support the weight of the 120-square-metre wooden ceiling.

Wooden panels were then sawed and drilled by a robot arm. At least that is what I think it says on their project page:

The Skilledin Office is an innovative indoor-office built in the InnovationDock (Rotterdam, NL) for the Port of Rotterdam. Its organic design balances program constraints and digital load-bearing optimization and fabrication possibilities.

The roof spans 120m2 with the largest span being 8m. It was constructed from 230 unique 37mm thick Metsäwood panels, directly milled from custom fabrication software with a refurbished ABB Robot at RDM Makerspace. All 3.200 Rothoblaas screws were robotically pre-drilled based on a parametric model of the final design.

(Photo and video: Studio RAP; link: Dezeen)

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December 20, 2012

Elegant wooden bowls from recycled oak

Filed under: Design by Orangemaster @ 1:36 pm

Designers Van Eijk and Van der Lubbe of Usuals have created 39 wooden bowls from five reclaimed oak poles they found at a Dutch farmhouse.

The wooden bowls have had carefully measured volumes removed from the body of each oak log, with the smooth cut-outs successfully contrasting the rustic ‘lived-in’ characteristics of the wood. They are unique and hand made, with cracks and flaws in each one.

(Link: www.designboom.com, Photo: www.usuals.nl)

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April 4, 2011

Wooden iPad 2 cover

Filed under: Gadgets,Technology by Branko Collin @ 10:10 am

Hot on the heels of the announcement of Apple’s latest toy comes this wooden cover for the iPad 2 by Dutch manufacturer Miniot. It works like Apple’s own Smart Cover, as it uses magnets that attach to the tablet, and the cover can be rolled up to function as a stand.

The Schagen, Noord Holland based company sells them or 50 euro or more. There’s a video that shows you how it works.

(Link: 9 to 5 mac. Photo: Miniot.)

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September 19, 2010

Zaandam turning green

Filed under: Architecture,Art by Branko Collin @ 6:34 pm

No, the headline is not about environmental technology but about paint. We wrote earlier about the hotel in Zaandam that is made to look like it’s constructed of dozens of the green wooden houses that are typical for the area. It turns out that this was just part of a plan to give a much larger part of the inner city that look, including city hall.

Trendbeheer has more photos of the work in progress.

Alderman Hans Luiten told De Volkskrant in March: “There have been times where I wondered if I could deal with this much identity.” The new city centre is a response to the neglect of the old one. Luiten: “In the past you would not have wanted to be found dead there.”

The man behind the reshaping of the centre of Zaandam into a green Disneyland/nightmare/whatever is architect Sjoerd Soeters who was also responsible for Java Island in Amsterdam. “All his works have been discussed vehemently among architects, but are also appreciated much by their users”, Volkskrant adds. It appears that behind Soeters’ façades lurks a strong vision of livable streets. Which may be why the main street on the aforementioned Java Island is a foot and bike path.

(Photo of the new city hall in Zaandam by Wikimedia user Arch who released it in the public domain)

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